Mae adeiladau eglwysi ni ar gau ar hyn o bryd oherwydd Canllawiau’r Llywodraeth o amgylch Covid-19. Serch hynnu, mae ein Heglwys yn dal i fod yn fyw ac yn weithgar iawn ac yn parhau i weddïo dros ein cymunedau a’r byd yn ystod yr amser argyfwng yma. Rydym hefyd yn darlledu gwasanaethau byw ar dudalen Facebook Bro Ardudwy.  Mae amseroedd y darllediadau byw ar y dudalen digwyddiadau

Croeso i wefan Ardal Weinidogaeth Bro Ardudwy

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3 hours ago

Bro Ardudwy

Alone with none but thee, my God,
I journey on my way:
what need I fear when thou art near,
O King of night and day?
more safe am I within thy hand
than if a host should round me stand.

My destined time is known to thee,
and death will keep his hour;
did warriors strong around me throng,
they could not stay his power:
No walls of stone can man defend
when thou thy messenger dost send.

My life I yield to thy decree,
and bow to thy control
in peaceful calm, for from thine arm
no power can wrest my soul:
could earthly omens e’er appal
a man that heeds the heavenly call?

The child of God can fear no ill,
his chosen, dread no foe;
we leave our fate with thee, and wait
thy bidding when to go:
’tis not from chance our comfort springs,
thou art our trust, O King of kings.

This ancient hymn is an anonymous translation of St. Columba’s Affirmation, attributed to St. Columba (521-597).

The Irish born Columba, (also known as Columcille, Colum, Columbus, Combs, and Columkill) founded no less than 27 monasteries in Ireland by the time he was 25 years of age. In 563, he along with 12 companions crossed the Irish Sea to establish the Iona Abbey. Columba would eventually venture further into Scotland and even the Outer Hebrides in his efforts to spread the Gospel.

This hymn is sung at Morning Prayer in the Divine Office,
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Alone with none but thee, my God,
I journey on my way:
what need I fear when thou art near,
O King of night and day?
more safe am I within thy hand
than if a host should round me stand.

My destined time is known to thee,
and death will keep his hour;
did warriors strong around me throng,
they could not stay his power:
No walls of stone can man defend
when thou thy messenger dost send.

My life I yield to thy decree,
and bow to thy control
in peaceful calm, for from thine arm
no power can wrest my soul:
could earthly omens eer appal
a man that heeds the heavenly call?

The child of God can fear no ill,
his chosen, dread no foe;
we leave our fate with thee, and wait
thy bidding when to go:
tis not from chance our comfort springs,
thou art our trust, O King of kings.

This ancient hymn is an anonymous translation of St. Columbas Affirmation, attributed to St. Columba (521-597). 

The Irish born Columba, (also known as Columcille, Colum, Columbus, Combs, and Columkill) founded no less than 27 monasteries in Ireland by the time he was 25 years of age. In 563, he along with 12 companions crossed the Irish Sea to establish the Iona Abbey. Columba would eventually venture further into Scotland and even the Outer Hebrides in his efforts to spread the Gospel. 

This hymn is sung at Morning Prayer in the Divine Office,

1 day ago

Bro Ardudwy

Ninth Sunday after Trinity See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Thank you so much for these wonderful services and all the time and effort you have all put into it! I have felt so blessed to pray with you. Somehow the Holy Spirit has been so active and affirming. Every best wish to Pam and also you all as you move gradually back into services in church 🙂

Bore da. Thinking of all those in Lebannon and praying for them and their families today. And also my friend Nicola who has lost her dad and aunt within weeks of each other

Peace be with you

Praying for Nicola right now

Thank you for a lovely service. Bye for now

Pray for the people in Lebanon who are affected by the huge explosion there

Diolch am wasanaeth hyfryd 🙏

Peace be with you

Bore da

Pob bendith Pam

Diolch a hwyl fawr

Tangnefedd

Peace be with you

Good morning

Tangnefedd

Bore da

We will still be streaming at 10:30 am. at St John's and then at the beginning of September from St Tanwg's in Harlech.

I hope you have all enjoyed being with us today.

Edrych ymlaen at weld St Tanwg, ble gefais i fedydd esgob ers talwm

and 23rd it will be at 10:30 am online and also in st john's church.

peace be with you all

So next Sunday it will be at 2 pm

bye now

time for your prayers

bore da pawb

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1 day ago

Bro Ardudwy

Yesterday, 8 August ,was the Feast of Saint Dominic, founder of the Order of Preachers. Although for some like him preaching was his Ministry, we are all called to speak about, to be prepared to talk about our faith.

In 1191, whilst studying theology and art , when Spain was desolated by famine, young Dominic gave away his money and sold his clothes, furniture, and even precious manuscripts to feed the hungry.

Around 1205, Dominic began involved in a programme in the south of France, to convert the Cathars, a Christian religious sect with gnostic and dualistic beliefs. Dominic concluded that only preachers who displayed real sanctity, humility and asceticism could win over convinced Cathar believers to the truth. Hence Dominic abstained from meat, "observed stated fasts and periods of silence", "selected the worst accommodations and the meanest clothes", and "never allowed himself the luxury of a bed". "We are told that Dominic frequently travelled barefoot and that "rain and other discomforts elicited from his lips nothing but praises to God".
His great concern was to bring other people to know Christ in their lives and spent often whole nights in the church at prayer in tears.

Entering a church to find someone quietly weeping in front of the altar is not an uncommon experience, but it is less usual to see people weeping over the sins of others. The desire to see others saved, often at great personal cost, is common to the lives of many saints and finds its roots in the experiences, recounted in the Scriptures, of people standing before God. For example, St Paul tells the Romans that he would gladly be counted as accursed and cut off from friendship with Christ in order to save Israel. Romans 9:3
A similar sentiment is voiced by Moses when nearly all of Israel fell from grace at the golden calf rebellion. Exodus 32:32

This sense of obligation towards others, of leading them into the fullness of truth, is at the heart of the mission of the religious order that Dominic founded.
The form of monastic life created by Dominic was freer than life under the Rule of St Benedict, allotting more time to study and less to manual labour. Moreover, this was really the first form of religious life to exist in the urban environment. Dominic felt compassion for other people. He acted in an incredibly Christlike way towards those whom he considered to be in error, those who had gone astray. His life and example give a refreshing breadth to the Christian understanding of charity.

Our world has changed so much in recent months but no matter what chaos Covid19 inflicts on the natural order and on our society, the world can be renewed and transfigured by faithfully preaching the Good News of our salvation.

As Christians, our charitable action is one of the ways in which we show the fruits of our faith; it is how we respond to the exhortation of St Francis of Assisi:
‘preach the Gospel at all times, and if necessary use words’.

Dominic broadens our understanding of charity to encompass preaching the Good News to others in such a way that it unites a life of prayer and actions aimed at alleviating the material needs of others, so all share in the bounty of God in the world, and a desire to share the greatest gift that we have: our faith in Jesus Christ.
See MoreSee Less

Yesterday, 8 August ,was the Feast of Saint Dominic, founder of the Order of Preachers.  Although for some like him preaching was his Ministry, we are all called to speak about, to be prepared to talk about our faith.

In 1191, whilst studying theology and art , when Spain was desolated by famine, young Dominic gave away his money and sold his clothes, furniture, and even precious manuscripts to feed the hungry.

Around 1205, Dominic began involved in a programme in the south of France, to convert the Cathars, a Christian religious sect with gnostic and dualistic beliefs.   Dominic concluded that only preachers who displayed real sanctity, humility and asceticism could win over convinced Cathar believers to the truth.  Hence Dominic abstained from meat, observed stated fasts and periods of silence, selected the worst accommodations and the meanest clothes, and never allowed himself the luxury of a bed. We are told that  Dominic frequently travelled barefoot and that rain and other discomforts elicited from his lips nothing but praises to God.
His great concern was to bring other people to know Christ in their lives and  spent often whole nights in the church at prayer in tears.

Entering a church to find someone quietly weeping in front of the altar is not an uncommon experience, but  it is  less usual to see people weeping over the sins of others. The desire to see others saved, often at great personal cost, is common to the lives of many saints and finds its roots in the experiences, recounted in the Scriptures, of people standing before God. For example, St Paul tells the Romans that he would gladly be counted as accursed and cut off from friendship with Christ in order to save Israel. Romans 9:3 
A similar sentiment is voiced by Moses when nearly all of Israel fell from grace at the golden calf rebellion. Exodus 32:32
 
This sense of obligation towards others, of leading them into the fullness of truth, is at the heart of the mission of the religious order that Dominic founded. 
The form of monastic life created by Dominic was freer than life under the Rule of St Benedict, allotting more time to study and less to manual labour. Moreover, this was really the first form of religious life to exist in the urban environment. Dominic felt compassion for other people. He acted in an incredibly Christlike way towards those whom he considered to be in error, those who had gone astray. His life and example give a refreshing breadth to the Christian understanding of charity.

Our world has changed so much in recent months but no matter what chaos Covid19 inflicts on the natural order and on our society, the world can be renewed and transfigured by faithfully preaching the Good News of our salvation.

As Christians, our charitable action is one of the ways in which we show the fruits of our faith; it is how we respond to the exhortation of St Francis of Assisi: 
‘preach the Gospel at all times, and if necessary use words’.

Dominic broadens our understanding of charity to encompass preaching the Good News to others in such a way that it unites a life of prayer and actions  aimed at alleviating the material needs of others, so all share in the bounty of God in the world,  and a desire to share the greatest gift that we have: our faith in Jesus Christ.

2 days ago

Bro Ardudwy

My gift yesterday was a packet of masks and one of real ground coffee, we were thinking about how as God’s servants we needed to be people who were both prepared to care for others (wearing a mask prevents the spread of the virus) and be kind to ourselves (hence the coffee because it takes time to brew it and really enjoy drinking it). We meditated on how God will use us in our weakness to his service and glory.
God uses broken people! He uses the weak and chooses throughout scripture to use flawed people to achieve great things.
Throughout the Bible, God uses broken vessels, weak people; the imperfect, the flawed, the “messed up”
God uses the weak because it’s that weakness and brokenness and the mistakes we have learned from that give us a voice to reach those people who maybe feel like they don’t measure up.
No one is too broken for God. God is able to take those broken pieces of our lives and put them into the refining fire and mould us into what HE knows we CAN be.
God in Jesus chose a brash, big-mouthed fisherman named Peter, he chose a king who committed adultery with Bathsheba and then had her husband killed to cover up his sin, He chose a prostitute, He chose a persecutor of believers, He chose a tax collector…and on and on.
He chooses flawed people because they have no cause to boast. They HAVE to rely on grace. If He chose a skilled orator and leader to lead the children out of Israel, he might have assumed to have done it through his own skill and leadership and not given the glory to God. Had Peter been a righteous and holy man, he may not have seen his need to lean on God and taken the credit for himself. There’s no question, when you are flawed, that it was GOD who did the work THROUGH you and not you on your own!
We can look at Moses and Jonah and Jeremiah (and many others) and see that we don’t need to be a great speaker or a skilled leader to do God’s work.
if God calls us to something we can trust Him to equip us for it.
God chooses the broken and God uses the broken! And it is in our weakness that, through Him, we are made strong! 2 Corinthians 12:10
The Japanese mend their precious broken things by filling them with gold.
God mends his precious broken things by cementing them with love.
See MoreSee Less

My gift yesterday was a packet of masks and one of real ground coffee, we were thinking about how as God’s servants we needed to be  people who were both prepared to care for others (wearing a mask  prevents the spread of the virus) and be kind to ourselves (hence the coffee because it takes time to brew it and really enjoy drinking it).  We meditated on how  God will use us in our weakness to his service and glory.
God uses broken people! He uses the weak and chooses throughout scripture to use flawed people to achieve great things. 
Throughout the Bible, God uses broken vessels, weak people; the imperfect, the flawed, the “messed up”
God uses the weak because it’s that weakness and brokenness and the mistakes we have learned from that give us a voice to reach those people who maybe feel like they don’t measure up. 
No one is too broken for God. God is able to take those broken pieces of our lives and put them into the refining fire and mould us into what HE knows we CAN be. 
God in Jesus chose a brash, big-mouthed fisherman named Peter, he chose a king who committed adultery with Bathsheba and then had her husband killed to cover up his sin, He chose a prostitute, He chose a persecutor of believers, He chose a tax collector…and on and on.
He chooses flawed people because they have no cause to boast. They HAVE to rely on grace. If He chose a skilled orator and leader to lead the children out of Israel, he might have assumed to have done it through his own skill and leadership and not given the glory to God.  Had Peter been a righteous and holy man, he may not have seen his need to lean on God and taken the credit for himself.  There’s no question, when you are flawed, that it was GOD who did the work THROUGH you and not you on your own!
We can look at Moses and Jonah and Jeremiah (and many others) and see that we don’t need to be a great speaker or a skilled leader to do God’s work.
if God calls us to something we can trust Him to equip us for it. 
God chooses the broken and God uses the broken!   And it is in our weakness that, through Him, we are made strong!    2 Corinthians 12:10
The Japanese mend their precious broken things by filling them with gold.
God mends his precious broken things by cementing them with love.

3 days ago

Bro Ardudwy

Yesterday’s gift in my box was a candle made by Dalit people in India. They are some of the poorest and most marginalised people in India but often give light and hope to others.

At our baptism we are given the light of Christ and bid ‘Shine as a light in the world to the glory of Od he Father’

We were offered the words of the Dalit creed to reflect on.

Reflect with me today on what we believe using creedal words from the Celtic tradition which have very similar clauses in them.

We believe in God who has created and is creating
Who has come in Jesus the Word made flesh
To reconcile and to make new.
Who works in us and other by the Spirit.
We trust in one God in whose image we are made
We are called to be the church
To celebrate God’s presence in each of us
To live with respect in creation.
To love and serve others,
To seek justice and resist evil
To proclaim Jesus, crucified and risen,
Our judge and our hope,
In life, in death and beyond death
God is with us We are not alone
Thanks be to God AMEN


We believe in God the Father ,
The almighty, who was and is and is to come

We believe in Jesus Christ, the faithful witness,
The firstborn from the dead
The King of kings,
Who loves us and frees us from our sins by his death and resurrection

We believe in the Spirit,
Giver of many gifts

We believe in the God of Three the Unity of One
We believe in One God, Father Son and holy Spirit.
AMEN
From Revelation 1
See MoreSee Less

Yesterday’s gift in my box was a candle made by Dalit people in India.  They are some of the poorest and most marginalised people in India but often give light and hope to others.

At our baptism we are given the light of Christ and bid ‘Shine as a light in the world to the glory of Od he Father’

We were offered the words of the Dalit creed to reflect on. 

Reflect with me today on what we believe using creedal words from the Celtic tradition which have very similar clauses in them.

We believe in God who has created and is creating
Who has come in Jesus the Word made flesh
To reconcile and to make new.
Who works in us and other by the Spirit.
We trust in one God in whose image we are made
We are called to be the church
To celebrate God’s presence in each of us
To live with respect in creation.
To love and serve others,
To seek justice and resist evil
To proclaim Jesus, crucified and risen,
Our judge and our hope,
In life, in death and beyond death  
God is with us We are not alone
Thanks be to God AMEN

 
We believe in God the Father ,
The almighty,  who was and is and is to come
 
We believe in Jesus Christ, the faithful witness,
The firstborn from the dead
The King of kings,
Who loves us and frees us from our sins by his   death and resurrection
 
We believe in the Spirit,
Giver of many gifts
 
We believe in the God of Three the Unity of One
We believe in One God, Father Son and holy Spirit.
AMEN
From Revelation 1

4 days ago

Bro Ardudwy

Life is only a reflection of what we allow ourselves to see
-Trudy Symeonakis Vesotsky.

What do you choose to see in yourself, in others, in the world around you?
We are called to see God in others, but ponder for a moment how is God revealed to others in us?
How aware are we of God in us, and how do our lives reflect God?
The practice of awareness begins by acknowledging our thoughts, our internal self- dialogue, our reaction to the world around us, the beautiful parts and the ugly parts.
When we focus on the positive, there is a tendency to see the positive. Positive things don’t have to be something large, there are plenty of tiny things going on around us that have the ability to make us feel blessed.

Jesus addressing the disciples said

‘But blessed are your eyes, for they see, and your ears, for they hear. For truly, I say to you, many prophets and righteous people longed to see what you see, and did not see it, and to hear what you hear, and did not hear it.’
Matthew 13:14-17

To see God in others you must first know God in yourself
To recognize something you must know it.
The good you find in others, is in you too.
The faults you find in others, are your faults as well.
After all, to recognize something you must know it
The possibilities you see in others, are possible for you as well.
The beauty you see around you, is your beauty.
The world around you is a reflection, a mirror showing you the person you are.
To change your world, you must change yourself.

See the best , the God , in others, and you will reveal God to others.
Give to others and you give to yourself.
Appreciate beauty, and you will be beautiful.
Admire creativity, and you will be creative.
Love, and you will be loved.

See to understand, and you will be understood.
Listen, and your voice will be heard.
Teach, and you will learn.
See MoreSee Less

Life is only a reflection of what we allow ourselves to see
-Trudy Symeonakis Vesotsky.

What do you choose to see in yourself, in others, in the world around you? 
We are called to see God in others, but ponder for a moment how is God revealed to others in us?    
How aware are we of God in us,  and how do our lives reflect God?
The practice of awareness begins by acknowledging our thoughts, our internal self- dialogue, our reaction to the world around us, the beautiful parts and the ugly parts.
When we focus on the positive, there is  a tendency to see the positive. Positive things dont have to be something large, there are plenty of tiny things going on around us that have the ability to make us feel blessed. 

Jesus  addressing the disciples said

‘But blessed are your eyes, for they see, and your ears, for they hear. For truly, I say to you, many prophets and righteous people longed to see what you see, and did not see it, and to hear what you hear, and did not hear it.’ 
Matthew 13:14-17 

To see God in others you must first know God in yourself
To recognize something you must know it.
The good you find in others, is in you too.
The faults you find in others, are your faults as well.
After all, to recognize something you must know it
The possibilities you see in others, are possible for you as well.
The beauty you see around you, is your beauty.
The world around you is a reflection, a mirror showing you the person you are.
To change your world, you must change yourself.

See the best , the God , in others, and you will reveal God to others.
Give to others and you give to yourself.
Appreciate beauty, and you will be beautiful.
Admire creativity, and you will be creative.
Love, and you will be loved.

See to understand, and you will be understood.
Listen, and your voice will be heard.
Teach, and you will learn.
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